© [2019], NCBFAA, Washington D.C. Monday Morning eBriefing. Originally published [02/10/2020]. www.ncbfaa.orgReprinted by permission.

The International Trade Administration (ITA) has announced that beginning April 4, certain fresh tomatoes from Mexico shall be subject to a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspection for quality and condition defects. The notice says that all Fresh Tomatoes from Mexico, with the exception of Tomatoes on the Vine, Specialty tomatoes, and grape tomatoes in retail packages of 2 pounds or less, shall be subject to a USDA inspection for quality and condition defects. ITA says that “USDA will perform inspections (an unrestricted certification) in accordance with its normal practice to determine quality, condition, and grade pursuant to the appropriate USDA standard covering fresh tomatoes and greenhouse tomatoes and using shipping point tolerances. After the USDA inspection, the importer will receive an inspection certificate, which must be maintained by the importer and is subject to submission to, and verification by, Commerce, consistent with the importer’s contractual obligation with the Signatory. If a lot of Signatory tomatoes has more defects than the tolerances established in the USDA standards, then the importer may opt either to recondition and re-inspect the lot, or return it to Mexico, consistent with the requirements of the 2019 Suspension Agreement.”

The International Trade Administration (ITA) has announced that beginning April 4, certain fresh tomatoes from Mexico shall be subject to a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspection for quality and condition defects. The notice says that all Fresh Tomatoes from Mexico, with the exception of Tomatoes on the Vine, Specialty tomatoes, and grape tomatoes in retail packages of 2 pounds or less, shall be subject to a USDA inspection for quality and condition defects. ITA says that “USDA will perform inspections (an unrestricted certification) in accordance with its normal practice to determine quality, condition, and grade pursuant to the appropriate USDA standard covering fresh tomatoes and greenhouse tomatoes and using shipping point tolerances. After the USDA inspection, the importer will receive an inspection certificate, which must be maintained by the importer and is subject to submission to, and verification by, Commerce, consistent with the importer’s contractual obligation with the Signatory. If a lot of Signatory tomatoes has more defects than the tolerances established in the USDA standards, then the importer may opt either to recondition and re-inspect the lot, or return it to Mexico, consistent with the requirements of the 2019 Suspension Agreement.”